PASSENGER CARS

Owned by the CNY NRHS

Long Island coach

MP-54A1c MU Coach: LIRR #1149

Pennsylvania Railroad Juniata Shops

History
Built in 1930 as Long Island RR #1149 → Renumbered #4149 in 1963 → Withdrawn from service in 1971 → Acquired by CNY NRHS in 1975.
On display at New York State Fairgrounds

D&H coach 229

Coach: Delaware & Hudson #229

Barney and Smith Company

History
Built in 1916 as D&H 229 → Modernized in 1943 → Donated to CNY NRHS in 1968 → Leased back to D&H in 1975 → Returned to CNY NRHS in 1977
On display at New York State Fairgrounds

B and O car

Combine: B&O #1302

Pullman Company

History
Built around 1920 for Baltimore and Ohio Railroad’s “National Limited” as a baggage-dorm-lounge → Modernized in 1940 → Acquired by CNY NRHS in 1969.
On display at New York State Fairgrounds

Rio Grande business car

Business Car: D&RGW 102

Pullman Company

History
Built in 1910 as Western Pacific (Denver & Rio Grande Western subsidiary) “heavyweight” steel coach #893 → Renumbered as D&RGW #924 on 2/6/1924 → Converted to coach “outfit” car (dormitory or “camp” car) #924 at D&RGW Burnham shops near Denver 10/12/1929 → Rebuilt into Business Car #102 at Burnham using 3-axle trucks from baggage car #740 3/27/1930 (this #102 replaced former #102 D&RGW “Ballyclare,” which was renumbered #103) → Air conditioned 7/1941 → Modernized with sealed windows in 1950s → Retired to Harris Allen & Associates in Tucson, AZ., 12/28/1964 → Later acquired by Clifford Thomas of Minneapolis, MN. → Purchased by Charles Belgarde and placed on display in Plymouth, MN., in 1971 → Later sold to Carolina Southern in Conway, SC., which was shut down by FRA in 2011 due to defective bridges → Came into possession of Iowa Pacific Holdings in 2012 → Transferred to CNY NRHS in 2013.
On display at New York State Fairgrounds

Chapter sales car

Sales Car: Former PRR Coach

History
Originally built as a coach for the Pennsylvania Railroad. Designated as Class P70fbR, it had unique and unusual porthole windows on both sides of one end for lavatories. Many of these cars were used in commuter services late in their lives by the PRR and successor Penn Central → Conrail → Acquired by New York State Operation Life Saver for use as a display car → Acquired by CNY NRHS in 2016 for use as a sales store.
On display at New York State Fairgrounds

 This was a joint order with other cars in this group built for another Pennsylvania Railroad subsidiary, the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad. These cars were the last MP54 class cars built for the LIRR, and this was the basic design used by the LIRR in various classes with minor differences. There were about 800 of all types of MP54 cars on the LIRR.

Oddly enough, this design utilized a flat-roof also known as railroad or clerestory-style, which had been used on the first MP54 class cars built beginning in 1908 but later abandoned in favor of an arch or round-roof design used on cars built after World War I due to economics. The return to the flat roof serves as proof that the cars were indeed built by the PRR since the cars built for the WJ&S needed a flat roof for pantographs, the device used on the roof to pick up AC power from the overhead catenary.

As painted by the CNY NRHS, the car wears the first LIRR paint scheme, which was basically a PRR scheme except for the LONG ISLAND lettering on the letterboard. This scheme ran from 1908 to 1949 when the LIRR declared bankruptcy and needed to change its image. This car, along with all other LIRR cars, wore two later paint schemes; the Tichy light gray scheme with off-white roof and window trim from about 1949 to 1955, and then in 1955, a dark gray body with Brunswick Green roof. Both of these schemes used white condensed gothic LONG ISLAND lettering. The storm or end doors of all LIRR headend or control motor cars in MU service began to be painted a bright orange in 1952 and in 1955, the entire ends were painted a bright orange.

Just about all of these cars were modernized in the 1950s or 1960s by the LIRR to extend their life, getting better heating, lighting and 3-2 seating instead of 2-2 seating. Records indicate that 1149 was rebuilt in June, 1963, and it was one of the last cars modernized. As per LIRR practice, rebuilt cars were renumbered; 1149 became 4149, the first “4” indicating it was a rebuilt control-motor car equipped with Automatic Speed Control.

All MP54s were gone by 1972 and 1149 (4149) was withdrawn from service sometime in 1971. The MP54A1c cars held up rather well and were among the last to be taken out of service and replaced by the Budd-built “Metropolitans.” The CNY NRHS acquired #1149 in 1975.

–Mike Boland, Long Island-Sunrise Trail Chapter, NRHS.